Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Joachim Roenneberg, who led a small team that sabotaged the Nazis' nuclear hopes during World War II, has died at the age of 99. Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg announced Roenneberg's death on Sunday, calling him a hero.

She left from Berlin, riding east. And on Thursday, she returned to Berlin, riding from the west. In between, Scottish cyclist Jenny Graham rode thousands of miles to become the fastest woman to ride around the world unsupported.

It took less than 125 days — just over one-third of a year — for Graham to complete the ride, covering some 18,000 miles on her bike. That lopped nearly three weeks off the old record of 144 days set by Paola Gianotti in 2014.

Afghanistan will wait an extra week to hold elections in Kandahar, the large province where a Taliban attack killed the powerful police chief on Thursday. The violence came just two days before Afghan voters are slated to elect members of parliamentary seats.

The Afghan Independent Election Commission recommended postponing the vote during an emergency meeting that included President Ashraf Ghani and the heads of the country's intelligence and security agencies.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

The U.K. and the EU might "create an option to extend the [Brexit] implementation period for a matter of months," U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May said Thursday after talks with European Union leaders stalled in Brussels.

The Brexit timetable currently calls for a 21-month transition to begin next March. But that could be in jeopardy, as negotiators have been unable to get past sticking points in laying out the terms of the U.K.'s departure from the EU.

The price of beer could rise sharply this century, and it has nothing to do with trends in craft brewing. Instead, a new study says beer prices could double, on average, because of the price of malted barley, a key ingredient in the world's favorite alcoholic drink.

By projecting heat and drought trends over the coming decades, a team of researchers in China, the U.K. and the U.S. found that barley production could be sharply affected by the shifting climate. And that means some parts of the world would very likely be forced to pay much more for a beer.

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