Diane Orson

Diane Orson is WNPR's local host for Morning Edition.  She's also a reporter and managing editor for WNPR, as well as a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories are heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here And Now.  Diane began at WBUR in Boston and came to Connecticut in 1988 as a co-producer for Open Air New England.  She shared a Peabody Award with Faith Middleton for their piece of radio nostalgia about New Haven's Shubert Theater.  Her reporting has  been recognized by the Connecticut Society for Professional Journalists and the Associated Press, including the Ellen Abrams Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism and the Walt Dibble Award for Overall Excellence.

Diane is also an active professional musician. She lives in Hamden with her husband and two children.

There’s been a rash of suspected drug overdoses on the New Haven Green today, with more than 30 people taken to area hospitals. New Haven Fire Chief John Alston says three people overdosed Tuesday night, another two more early Wednesday morning.

Hundreds of Honduran immigrants in Connecticut and Massachusetts will find out in the coming months whether they’ll be allowed to stay in the U.S. or face possible deportation. This comes as violent protests continue in Honduras following a contested presidential election.

Dozens of immigrants, their supporters, and elected officials rallied Wednesday in front of Hartford’s federal courthouse, opposing the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

Research shows girls and boys perform equally well in science, technology, engineering and math while in school. But that doesn't always follow into careers in the STEM workforce where, particularly in certain fields, there's still a gender gap.

It's been 60 years since singer Harry Belafonte released The Banana Boat Song (Day-O) on vinyl. He had spent much of his youth in Jamaica and has said he chose to sing the traditional island work song as a way to challenge negative cultural assumptions about people of the Caribbean.

One week after Hurricane Maria pummeled Puerto Rico, the U.S. Defense Department said 80 percent of the island’s electricity lines are damaged and nearly half its residents are without drinking water.