Harriet Jones

Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Yale University law students staged a sit-in at the school Monday, and also sent a delegation to Washington D.C. They were calling for an investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, a Yale undergrad and law school alumnus. 

A second allegation of sexual assault has placed Yale University firmly at the center of the confirmation battle for the next Supreme Court justice. A former Yale classmate of nominee Brett Kavanaugh has now come forward to say that he sexually assaulted her at a party when he was in his freshman year at the university.

As Hurricane Florence came ashore in the Carolinas, insurance companies prepared to process thousands of claims. The storm combined high winds and continues to bring massive amounts of rain. 

The state of Connecticut is attempting to recover almost $11 million of taxpayer money it says was lost to an illegal kickback scheme run through the pharmacy benefit plan for state employees. 

Ben Davol, a political strategist and former Connecticut state chairman for John McCain’s first presidential run, died this weekend at the age of 58. 

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