ARTS & CULTURE

Massachusetts artists might not be starving, but a new report indicates they are struggling mightily to make a living here. Nearly 50 percent of those surveyed said they had “business loss” from their creative practices. Even more need to work outside their skill and craft to survive.

An all-volunteer, grassroots team of advocates crunched data from 846 working artists, makers and creative entrepreneurs across the state for the new report titled, “2018 By Artists, For Artists.”

A sidewalk scene in Worcester, Massachusetts.
Liz West / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/calliope

To say the arts are nice, but not necessary, negates some clear trends, according to the Massachusetts arts advocacy group MASSCreative. 

Do you listen to Public Radio? Are you often quoting NEPR stories you heard to friends in conversation? Do you constantly find yourself listening while doodling? This might be the answer for you to give back that love of listening to your public radio station! 

New England Public Radio is seeking submissions from  for our annual Art Mug! The limited-edition mug will be available to New England Public Radio's contributing listeners during the station's on-air fund drives from September 2018 through June 2019.

Exterior MGM Springfield's entrance to the South End Market off MGM Way at State Street in downtown Springfield, Massachusetts.
MARK M. MURRAY / THE REPUBLICAN / masslive.com/photos

Construction is wrapping up on the MGM Springfield casino. The company says it is exceeding diversity goals when it comes to minorities, women and veterans. 

The Manzi Family Band in a Longmeadow, Massachusetts, basement, rehearsing for their July 14, 2018, show at the Majestic Theater in West Springfield, Massachusetts.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

Getting ready for a rare appearance, the Manzi Family Band was in full rehearsal on a recent summer afternoon in a basement in Longmeadow, Massachusetts.

Beach sand.
Petr Kratochvil / Creative Commons

On Saturday, nearly 500,000 pounds of donated sand will transform one of North Adams's main roads into an urban beach for the 20th annual Eagle Street Beach Party.

Gordon Thorne at 33 Hawley, in Northampton, Massachusetts, the site of a future Northampton Community Arts Trust performance space. Thorne was one of the trust's founders.
Stephen Petegorsky / https://spphoto.com/

For many, his name is connected to Thorne's Marketplace in Northampton, Massachusetts, which he once owned, but Gordon Thorne was also a visual artist and a philanthropist. He died last week at the age of age of 77.

The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.
AlexiusHoratius / Creative Commons

The executive director of the Berkshire Museum, who's recently led the Pittsfield, Massachusetts, institution through big plans and much controversy, is retiring.

What Philip Roth Has To Tell Us About Anti-Semitism

Jun 13, 2018
South Carolina passed a law to counter anti-Semitism on college campuses, following a violent white supremacist rally last year in Charlottesville. Pictured, rally participants prepare to enter Emancipation Park on August 12, 2017.
Anthony Crider / Creative Commons / flickr.com/people/16086041@N00

I know it might seem confusing. Why wouldn’t Jews support a law that combats anti-Semitism? Wouldn’t that be like gay people opposing a law against homophobia, or people of color rejecting a law against racism?

The portrait of Russell Sturgis at the Worcester Art Museum has a new sign next to it with information about his connections to slavery.
Robin Lubbock / WBUR

At the Worcester Art Museum's early American portrait gallery, I was recently struck by a painting of a man named Russell Sturgis.

Pages