CONNECTICUT

Coverage of Connecticut from New England Public Radio, NPR, and other NPR stations.

It’s a hot day in Brownsville, Texas. U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree of Maine sits shotgun in a silver Mercedes SUV, talking to her driver, a Brownsville city official. She turns around, leaning over her left shoulder, and explains what it was like earlier in the day when she spoke with a group of migrant mothers in a nearby U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facility.

At "Springfield's Big Gamble," (left to right) Reminder Publication's Mike Dobbs, Mark Pazniokas of The Connecticut Mirror, The Berkshire Eagle's Kristin Palpini, Af Am Point of View's Rick Hurst and New England News Collaborative editor John Dankosky.
Joyce Skowyra / NEPR

NEPR and the New England News Collaborative hosted a lively discussion on June 19, 2018, with some of the region's top reporters on the casino beat.

Richard Robinson has been sworn in as Connecticut’s next Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. He is the first African American to hold the post. 

New Haven, Hartford, and Springfield are now connected by rail service. The inaugural trains left Friday morning from Springfield and New Haven, meeting in Hartford for a ceremony to mark the opening of the revived line. 

Former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez pleaded guilty last year to two felony corruption charges related to his time in office. Now, Perez is trying to get the city of Hartford to pay his more than $1 million in legal bills.

In Connecticut, Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim is likely to qualify for the Democratic Party primary for governor. That’s what state officials are saying following Tuesday’s deadline for petitioning candidates to submit signatures.

This week the new Hartford Line commuter rail will link Springfield, Massachusetts, to New Haven, Connecticut, and cities in between. For less than $16, commuters can catch more than 12 trains each day and travel speeds up to 110 miles an hour.

Angelina Morales holds her Connecticut history chapter book; Chapter 2 is about the African-American dancer, Dollie McLean.
Tema Silk / NEPR

In Connecticut, third- and fourth-graders study the history of their state. In many schools, students choose to research one person or event from an approved list. The people on that list have been mostly men, and all white.

Officials in Connecticut and New York are praising a federal court decision, which says the Environmental Protection Agency needs to do more to control air pollution.

What Philip Roth Has To Tell Us About Anti-Semitism

Jun 13, 2018
South Carolina passed a law to counter anti-Semitism on college campuses, following a violent white supremacist rally last year in Charlottesville. Pictured, rally participants prepare to enter Emancipation Park on August 12, 2017.
Anthony Crider / Creative Commons / flickr.com/people/16086041@N00

I know it might seem confusing. Why wouldn’t Jews support a law that combats anti-Semitism? Wouldn’t that be like gay people opposing a law against homophobia, or people of color rejecting a law against racism?

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