DEMOGRAPHICS

When it’s time to pour the concrete, a construction worker may suffer through a back strain and use prescribed painkillers to stay on the job. Same for an injured deckhand heading to Georges Bank to haul in nets filled with fish.

A path from injury to medication, and then to addiction and death, may explain why workers in these jobs — men in particular — have had in recent years fatal opioid overdoses far more often in Massachusetts than do workers as a whole.

Farmer Norm Davenport in Shelburne, Massachusetts, can't find enough customers to purchase his hay.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

In recent years, milk prices have dropped. And dairy farms -- including some in western Massachusetts -- have sold off their cows. Some say their hay customers are disappearing along with the animals.

Massachusetts artists might not be starving, but a new report indicates they are struggling mightily to make a living here. Nearly 50 percent of those surveyed said they had “business loss” from their creative practices. Even more need to work outside their skill and craft to survive.

An all-volunteer, grassroots team of advocates crunched data from 846 working artists, makers and creative entrepreneurs across the state for the new report titled, “2018 By Artists, For Artists.”

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

Editor's Note: This story contains a vulgar word.

A federal judge in Manhattan has ruled that the largest of the six lawsuits against the new citizenship question on the 2020 census can move forward in court.

Tatiana Melendez waited in the shade during a New England heat wave, ready to make a move.

“I got all the information for you, all right,” Melendez, 46, said as she handed a baggie of info to a passerby. “This is very good for you. For everybody doing sex.”

Despite Progress, HIV Racial Divide Persists

Jul 23, 2018

By the time Arthur Harris Jr. turned 17, he had already endured a childhood of grinding poverty in Hartford’s North End, the death of his mother, and the rejection of a community that viewed homosexuality as a sin. It should have come as no surprise to anyone, then, that he went searching for love and acceptance wherever he could find it — a search that landed him in the arms of a man nearly twice his age and, later, in the kinds of risky situations he’d been warned about in his high school health class.

People looking to get a job at MGM Springfield use the computer to match their skills to potential jobs, during a career fair in October 2014.
Mark M. Murray / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

MGM officials told Massachusetts gambling regulators Thursday that the company is on pace to hire 3,000 employees before it opens its Springfield casino next month. But so far, MGM is coming up short on some hiring goals.

U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont introduced legislation last week that would put limits on where Border Patrol officers can operate immigration checkpoints. The “Border Zone Reasonableness Restoration Act of 2018” is co-sponsored by Senator Patty Murray (D-Wash.).

Suicide rates have increased in nearly every state over the past two decades, and half of the states have seen suicide rates go up more than 30 percent.

Suicide is a major public health issue, accounting for nearly 45,000 deaths in 2016 alone. That is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta decided to take a comprehensive look at suicides from 1999 to 2016.

Connecticut Juvenile Training School Closes

Apr 13, 2018

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy said Friday that he’s not expecting the Connecticut Juvenile Training School in Middletown, the state’s only juvenile prison, to ever be used again as a youth detention facility.

“We can reasonably predict that we will have less need for prisons in the future,” Malloy said, “So whether this prison, as badly built and designed as it was, will ever be used for something? I am not sure whether those cells will be. They were cells that were built, for instance, without toilets. Which, you know, made not sense at all.”

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