ELECTIONS

Stay informed with local, regional and national election coverage.

A hearing that could decide the fate of the voter registration law known as Senate Bill 3 began Aug. 27 in Manchester and continued for nearly two full weeks, concluding Sept. 7.

The polling place at Falcetti Towers in Holyoke, Mass., saw light turnout on Sept. 26, 2017, for a preliminary election for mayor.
Sam Hudzik / NEPR

Massachusetts on Thursday became the 14th state in the country to adopt an automatic voter registration system, according to Secretary of State William Galvin and advocates who backed the measure. 

Mexico's hard swing to the left in this month's national elections also swept in some other historic firsts. Women won key positions across the country, including, for the first time ever, the mayor of Mexico City.

Claudia Sheinbaum Pardo, 56, will assume arguably the second most important political post in Mexico, after capturing nearly 50 percent of the vote in the July 1 elections.

Updated at 9:38 p.m. ET

The Justice Department charged 12 Russian intelligence officers on Friday with a litany of alleged offenses related to Russia's hacking of the Democratic National Committee's emails, state election systems and other targets in 2016.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who announced the indictments, said the Russians involved belonged to the military intelligence service GRU. They are accused of a sustained cyberattack against Democratic Party targets, including its campaign committee and Hillary Clinton's campaign.

Auto Voter Registration Bill Could Soon Reach Massachusetts Governor

Jul 12, 2018
Several rows of sign-holders greet voters as they drove down the driveway to White Brook Middle School in Easthampton.
Sam Hudzik / NEPR

The Massachusetts Senate unanimously passed a bill Thursday intended to encourage more participation in elections by enrolling voters when they interact with the Registry of Motor Vehicles or MassHealth -- unless they opt out. 

The U.S. Supreme Court.
MattWade / Creative Commons / commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:MattWade

There was a flury of action this week involving the U.S. Supreme Court. One ruling handed down this week attracted attention in Massachusetts and elsewhere, involving payments to unions. 

It was a big night for supporters of ranked-choice voting. 

On Tuesday, Maine primary voters will participate in a ranked-choice voting experiment so unprecedented that the state’s top election official sometimes compares what’s about to happen to a perilous space mission.

Updated 6:34 p.m. ET

An ideologically split U.S. Supreme Court Monday upheld Ohio's controversial "use-it-or-lose-it" voting law by a 5-to-4 margin. The law allows the state to strike voters from the registration rolls if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form, and don't vote for another four years, or two federal election cycles.

Failure to vote

Connecticut is poised to commit its electoral votes to whichever U.S. presidential candidate wins the nation's popular vote — regardless of who wins the state.

By embracing the plan, Connecticut's General Assembly gave new momentum to a push to change the way Americans elect their president.

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