ENVIRONMENT

Updated Sept. 17, 3:23pm

Last November, Juan Rojas, 30, and his family moved to New Bern, N.C. from Puerto Rico. Their livelihoods came to a halt after Hurricane Maria devastated the island. After Hurricane Florence rapidly strengthened on Monday, he and his family decided to leave.

Juan evacuated to a relative's home in Duluth, Ga. His sister, niece, nephew and parents are in Marietta, Ga., where his brother lives.

A stretch of the Housatonic River that under an EPA proposal would be dredged to remove PCBs.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and General Electric Co. are funding a new approach to negotiating an agreement on the cleanup of the Housatonic River. Just last week, many of the stakeholders met with an independent mediator.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

In Charleston, S.C., a major interstate is reversing direction for about 100 miles, sending every lane inland — even earlier than originally scheduled.

In the Outer Banks, N.C., where tourists and residents rely on a few bridges and ferries for access to the mainland, authorities are warning residents to get out immediately. The state's governor has taken the unprecedented step of issuing a state-level, mandatory evacuation order, instead of relying on local governments.

Updated at 6:15 a.m. ET on Wednesday

The severity of Hurricane Florence, a Category 4 storm, is intensifying and triggering hurricane warnings along the coasts of the Carolinas, the National Hurricane Center announced in its 5 a.m. Wednesday update.

Hurricane Florence is moving relentlessly toward the Southeastern U.S. It's a large, powerful cyclone that will likely bring storm surge and high winds to coastal communities.

But climate scientists say one of the biggest threats posed by Florence is rain.

Pages