HOSPITALS

The conflicting red, white and blue signs that claim to speak for Massachusetts nurses are everywhere: “Nurses say NO on 1” and “Nurses say YES on 1.”

So which is right? Well, it turns out they both are.

A WBUR poll of 500 registered nurses shows 48 percent plan to vote for the ballot question that would establish nurse-to-patient ratios in state law, and 45 percent say they’ll vote against the measure. Seven percent are undecided.

A mountainside hemlock forest.
Nicholas A. Tonelli / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/nicholas_t

A search-and-rescue team carried me down on a stretcher. They hoisted me high up into the trail’s hemlock and spruce so I was surrounded by their needles and resin. 

Massachusetts Nurses Association president Donna Kelly-Williams speaks in favor of the statewide ballot question.
Chris Triunfo / State House News Service

A Massachusetts ballot initiative on nurse staffing ratios would cost hundreds of millions of dollars a year, according to an estimate issued Wednesday by a state panel.

Many people who attempt suicide end up in an emergency room for immediate treatment. But few of those suicide survivors get the follow-up care they need at a time when they are especially likely to attempt suicide again.

Now, a study shows that a simple intervention conducted by staff in emergency departments can reduce the risk of future attempts. The intervention involves creating a safety plan for each patient and following up with phone calls after discharge.

Shriners Hospital for Children in Springfield, Massachusetts.
Masslive / masslive.com/photos

Shriners Hospital for Children in Springfield, Massachusetts, is opening a new inpatient rehabilitation service that provides therapy for children recovering from complex injuries.

Pages