INFRASTRUCTURE

The I-word is popping up again in Washington D.C.: infrastructure.

It's one of the few issues on which President Trump and Democrats in Congress might be able to agree. Both sides say they're willing to work together on a plan to rebuild the nation's roads, bridges, transit and water systems.

"It really could be a beautiful bipartisan type of situation," Trump said in his news conference last Wednesday. While he was combative on a lot of issues, this wasn't one of them: "We have a lot of things in common on infrastructure," he added.

Warning signs like this are posted in towns and cities along the Connecticut River where combined sewer overflows may discharge.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

A ruptured sewage pipe in Holyoke, Massachusetts, spilled unknown amounts of raw sewage into the Connecticut River this week. The break happened underground Monday, on a steep embankment north of the Holyoke Dam.

State ballot Question 3, which asks voters if they want to keep a transgender civil rights law, has put the spotlight on bathrooms. But the marketplace for bathrooms isn’t waiting for election day. There’s a wide range of changes underway.

Some more good news for Connecticut homeowners who are struggling with crumbling foundations -- many will now be able to deduct the cost of repairs from their federal taxes over the next two decades. 

The Hampden County Courthouse in Springfield, Mass., which was renamed the Roderick L. Ireland Courthouse in 2017.
Don Treeger / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

Massachusetts officials met with employees of a Springfield courthouse Friday over concerns the building is making people sick. 

Pages