VERMONT

Coverage of Vermont from New England Public Radio, NPR, and other NPR stations.

Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy said he doesn't know how anyone could respect Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore.

This weekend, a one-time Vermonter returns to the state to perform in honor of the woman who helped launch his career as a pianist and conductor.

Vermont Rail System is storing tanker cars filled with propane near a residential neighborhood in Bennington, and some of the people who live nearby are wondering what they can do to ensure their safety.

For employers, team building is considered vital if you want to extract the best out of your workforce. To boost camaraderie, many businesses schedule day trips or special activities like high ropes courses, paintball or mock game shows. But Jennifer Cohen, a long time teacher in Rutland, is using music to enhance team building and communication skills.

All three members of Vermont's congressional delegation are urging the Federal Communications Commission not to repeal internet policies known as "net neutrality."

Governor Chris Sununu and Vermont Governor Phil Scott signed a joint letter to House and Senate leadership Monday, calling on Congress to increase funding for fighting and preventing forest fires.

“This is far from just a ‘Western’ issue,” they wrote, arguing the Forest Service is increasingly allocating its funds to fight fires at the expense of other priorities.

As attitudes toward pain management change, some researchers say there's better evidence supporting cannabis use for chronic neuropathic pain management than opioids. Yet, for this Vermonter, an opioid prescription costs a dollar, while medical marijuana costs hundreds.

An estimated 30,000 people packed Killington last November to see the worlds fastest women go head to head in slalom and giant slalom.

Before he became head baker at King Arthur Flour in Norwich, Martin Philip trained as an opera singer and worked for an investment bank in New York City. Now the baker and author is sharing his expertise and answering questions for aspiring bakers.

Robert Siegel, senior host of NPR's All Things Considered, is speaking to the Vermont Humanities Council this week, reflecting on more than four decades working in radio newsrooms. It's an apt time for reflection for the seasoned host, as he prepares to step away from the mic and retire in January 2018.

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