WATER

The Connecticut River seen in Sunderland, Massachusetts.
Tom Walsh / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/wmass

Thousands of volunteers helped collect an estimated 50 tons of trash from the Connecticut River and its tributaries in four states last week.

The sun is shining again on North Carolina as the remnants of Hurricane Florence have moved into the mid-Atlantic. But a catastrophe is still unfolding, as rivers rise after days of torrential rains. As residents of the Carolinas start to clean up, difficult questions are being raised about how to best recover along the coastline and whether some residents facing repeated flooding should consider moving inland.

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET on Tuesday

People in North Carolina and South Carolina are coping with flooding, closed roads and power outages as what the National Hurricane Center now calls Post-Tropical Cyclone Florence moves toward the northeast.

"Florence becoming an increasingly elongated low pressure area as it continues to produce heavy rain and over parts of the mid-Atlantic region," according to the hurricane forecasters.

As Hurricane Florence came ashore in the Carolinas, insurance companies prepared to process thousands of claims. The storm combined high winds and continues to bring massive amounts of rain. 

A view on November 23, 2012, from Armory Commons in Springfield, Massachusetts, of some of the damage to the areas on Worhtington St. after a gas explosion.
David Molnar / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

A natural gas explosion impacting three communities north of Boston is not the first in recent years for the company, Columbia Gas. 

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