Summer Fiction Series

Summertime means barbecue, beach…and New England Public Radio’s annual local fiction series. Every Friday morning, we’ll feature an interview with an author from New England who’s got a new novel out for those lazy days in the sun. As the season progresses, you can hear each interview archived here and start your summer reading list. 

Ways to Connect

A person walking through the sand.
Raechel Romero / Creative Commons

The latest book by Florence, Massachusetts, author Robert V.S. Redick is a fantasy tale about two brothers running for their lives through a desert during wartime. 

A Miami traffic jam.
B137 / Creative Commons

In most road-trip novels, characters walk or drive or sail as they look for answers to sometimes unanswerable questions.

South Hadley, Massachusetts author Enid Sichel holds her book, "Death And Turtles."
Carrie Healy / NEPR

Our summer fiction series continues with a mystery called "Death and Turtles." It takes place during the Depression -- 1934 -- in England. 

Northampton, Massachusetts, author Debra Jo Immergut.
Submitted / Stephen Lewis

After years of editing a lifestyle magazine, Northampton, Massachusetts, writer Debra Jo Immergut has published her first novel. 

Andrea Lawlor.
Rescue Press

In Andrea Lawlor’s debut novel, "Paul Takes the Form of a Mortal Girl," readers join the main character on a journey stretching from Provincetown to San Francisco.  

August Thomas at the Montague Bookmill.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

Author August Thomas spent a lot of time working on her latest novel at the independent bookstore in Montague, Massachusetts, called The Bookmill -- so that's where we met to talk to kick off our summer fiction series.

Judge Michael Ponsor, holding his first novel, "The Hanging Judge," which was published in 2013.
File photo / The Republican

When Springfield federal Judge Michael Ponsor semi-retired after three decades on the bench, he started to enjoy two privileges of part time work: He could choose the type of cases he wanted, and he had a lot more time for his other professional passion, fiction writing.

James Carse, at his home in Rowe, Mass.
Carrie Healy / NEPR

The next book in our summer fiction series took Rowe, Massachusetts, author James Carse five years to create, from start "to publish."

In his whodunit novel "PhDeath: The Puzzler Murders," the perp creates puzzles, and a group of academics solves them to learn the identity of the victim.

Author Zane Kotker lives in Northampton, Mass.
Joyce Skowyra / NEPR

In Northampton, Massachusetts, writer Zane Kotker's latest book, three widows in their early 70s deal with loneliness, fear of death, a condo association and internet dating.

"Goodnight, Ladies" is a 111-page novella, and the latest pick in our summer fiction series. 

Naila Moreira
Jermane Stephinger

We continue our summer fiction series with a form of literature that is not strictly "made up." 

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