Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Despite intensifying grassroots protests, the French government won't be reversing course on a gasoline tax that's designed to help the country transition away from fossil fuels.

In a speech on Tuesday, French President Emmanuel Macron said he sympathizes with the protesters and offered some conciliatory gestures, but stood firm on the tax that prompted the anger.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has traced an ongoing E. coli outbreak to romaine lettuce grown in the Central Coastal region of California.

Lettuce from other parts of the U.S. and Mexico is safe to eat, the CDC says. However, if you're not sure where your romaine lettuce came from, err on the side of caution and throw it out, health experts say.

A total of 43 people in 12 states have been infected in this outbreak. No deaths have been reported.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

The situation at the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry has been chaotic and confusing in recent days. And reactions from the American public suggest that photos and footage from the scene serve as a sort of Rorschach test.

Updated at 3:13 p.m. ET on Friday

In the global fight against climate change, the United Kingdom has quietly notched an unusual — and somewhat mystifying — victory.

For well over a decade, the country's total energy consumption has dropped steadily. All told, there's been a 10 percent decline since 2002, after accounting for temperature variation.

The trend is widespread, documented in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors (though not, notably, in transportation). It's not tied to economic decline or supply shortages.

An 18-year-old in Hemer, Germany, managed to earn and lose his drivers' license over the course of less than an hour.

He successfully obtained his license on Tuesday and celebrated — how else? — by going for a drive. At nearly twice the legal speed limit.

Just 49 minutes after he earned his license, a police laser speed gun clocked him going 95 km/hr in a 50 km/hr zone — that is, nearly 60 mph in a 32 mph area.

Just like that, his brand-new license was no more.

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