Fred Bever

A Columbia University graduate, Fred began his journalism career as a print reporter in Vermont, then came to Maine Public in 2001 as its political reporter, as well as serving as a host for a variety of Maine Public Radio and Maine Public Television programs. Fred later went on to become news director for New England Public Radio in Western Massachusetts and worked as a freelancer for National Public Radio and a number of regional public radio stations, including WBUR in Boston and NHPR in New Hampshire.

Fred formerly was Maine Public Radio’s chief political correspondent from 2001 to 2007 and returned to Maine Public Radio in early 2016 as a news reporter and producer, covering a wide variety of topics across Maine and the region.

The debate over Central Maine Power’s proposed billion-dollar transmission project is about more than just money. It’s also about threats to scenic vistas, wildlife habitat and backwoods culture, and whether all of that should take a back seat to what some see as the most urgent challenge of the day — fighting climate change.

Gov. Janet Mills and two environmental groups are signing on to Central Maine Power's bid to build a controversial new transmission line through western Maine's forests. That significantly broadens the coalition of interests supporting the project, but the deal is also drawing fire from other environmental groups, grassroots opponents and some renewable energy developers in Maine.

For many in the community surrounding Walker's Point in Kennebunkport, Maine, the former President George H.W. Bush was much more than the leader of the free world — he was their beloved friend and neighbor.

No matter where in the globe former President Bush's pursuits took him, he circled back every year, as if tethered, to Walker's Point — the estate his ancestors established more than a century ago on a windy promontory off Kennebunkport.

George Herbert Walker Bush died late Friday. For many in the community surrounding Walker's Point in Kennebunkport, Maine, the former president was much more than the leader of the free world — he was their beloved friend and neighbor.

A panel of regulators from Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts voted Friday to put a three-year moratorium on the commercial fishery for Northern Shrimp, also known as Maine shrimp. Maine's representatives at the meeting in Portland wanted some type of season preserved, but they were outnumbered.

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