Harriet Jones

Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Connecticut officials this week marked the one year anniversary of the Hartford Line commuter rail service which stretches from New Haven to Springfield. And the Department of Transportation is touting the first year as a success -- despite teething problems -- saying ridership for the year exceeded 634,000 passengers, about 50,000 more than projected. 

In a surprise announcement, Farmington-based United Technologies said Sunday evening it’s merging with another aerospace giant, Raytheon. The combined company's headquarters will be in Raytheon's home state of Massachusetts, marking the seismic loss of a homegrown giant for Connecticut.

New Haven fire and police officials say a two-alarm fire at the Diyanet Mosque on Middletown Avenue on Sunday was intentionally set. 

Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal told Attorney General William Barr that history will judge him harshly for his role in the handling of the report of Special Counsel Robert Mueller. That was just the beginning of a testy exchange between the two as Barr testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee. 

As communities all over the country continue to debate how to keep children safe at school, many districts have turned to School Resource Officers, or SROs -- essentially uniformed and armed police officers in school. But a new study in Connecticut shows that SROs can have a negative impact on students. 

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