Harriet Jones

Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Stop & Shop workers will be back on the job Monday morning after unions and management at the grocery chain announced Sunday evening that they had reached a tentative agreement on a new three-year contract. The announcement comes after a strike lasting 11 days, that affected 240 stores in Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

Catherine Velez, who is a Stop & Shop Peapod employee, joined her coworkers in East Hartford, Connecticut, as they went on strike against the company on Thursday, April 11, 2019.
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Updated 10:30 p.m.

Workers clustered together at the two entrances to the Stop & Shop store in East Hartford, Connecticut, holding signs in the air and chanting, "Better contract, better lives. Better contract, better lives!"

Billionaire hedge fund manager Ray Dalio and his wife Barbara are making a $100 million donation to Connecticut Public Schools. It’s part of what the state hopes will be a $300 million public private partnership. 

Connecticut is one step closer to bringing tolls back to the state. The legislature's Transportation Committee voted in favor of moving forward three bills related to tolling, including Governor Ned Lamont's plan that would put tolls on interstates 91, 95 and 84, as well as portions of Route 15. 

In a wide-ranging interview with Connecticut Public Radio, Governor Ned Lamont Monday touted some of his policy and personnel changes in the crucial areas of transportation and economic development.

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