Jessica Taylor

Jessica Taylor is a political reporter with NPR based in Washington, DC, covering elections and breaking news out of the White House and Congress. Her reporting can be heard and seen on a variety of NPR platforms, from on air to online. For more than a decade, she has reported on and analyzed House and Senate elections and is a contributing author to the 2020 edition of The Almanac of American Politics and is a senior contributor to The Cook Political Report.

Before joining NPR in May 2015, Taylor was the campaign editor for The Hill newspaper. Taylor has also reported for the NBC News Political Unit, Inside Elections, National Journal, The Hotline and Politico. Taylor has appeared on MSNBC, Fox News, C-SPAN, CNN, and she is a regular on the weekly roundup on NPR's 1A with Joshua Johnson. On Election Night 2012, Taylor served as an off-air analyst for CBS News in New York.

A native of Elizabethton, Tennessee, she graduated magna cum laude in 2007 with a B.A. in political science from Furman University.

Updated at 8:06 p.m. ET

The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service did not meet House Democrats' deadline to turn over President Trump's past tax returns by Wednesday, escalating what will likely culminate in a legal battle in the investigation into the president's personal and business finances.

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan is the latest Democrat to join the growing field seeking the 2020 presidential nomination.

Ryan announced his intentions on ABC's The View on Thursday, telling the panel that he is running to be a champion for manufacturing in a country that has been fractured by trade and outsourcing.

"I understand that legacy of job loss. ... I understand where we need to go. The country's so divided right now that we can't get a plan together. The first thing we ought to do is unify," Ryan said.

A former Nevada Democratic assemblywoman and candidate for lieutenant governor has come forward detailing an unwanted encounter with Vice President Joe Biden when he campaigned for her in 2014.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

Attorney General William Barr has told congressional leaders that he anticipates being able to give them a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on his investigation into Russia's interference with the 2016 presidential election by "by mid-April, if not sooner." Democratic lawmakers have been pushing for lawmakers to see the full report without redactions, though members of both parties have called for its public release.

Updated at 4:58 p.m. ET

After nearly two years of waiting, special counsel Robert Mueller's report into Russia's attack on the 2016 presidential election is finally done. And there's growing bipartisan pressure on Attorney General William Barr to make it public.

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