Jill Kaufman

Arts and Culture Reporter

Jill has been reporting, producing features and commentaries, and hosting shows at NEPR since 2005. Before that she spent almost 10 years at WBUR in Boston, five of them producing PRI’s “The Connection”  with Christopher Lydon. In the months leading up to the 2000 primary in New Hampshire, Jill hosted NHPR’s daily talk show, and subsequently hosted NPR’s All Things Considered during the South Carolina Primary weekend. Right before coming to NEPR, Jill was an editor at PRI's The World, working with station based reporters on the international stories in their own domestic backyards. Getting people to tell her their stories, she says, never gets old.

Composer Kate Soper plays Polyxo in a scene from her opera "Here Be Sirens" in New York City in 2014.
Noah Arjomand / Courtesy Kate Soper

Opera fans, and even non-fans, are familiar with the music of Bizet's "Carmen" or Puccini's "Madama Butterfly." Lesser-known is the world of new opera, like "Here Be Sirens," composed by a Smith College professor and on stage in Northampton, Massachusetts, this weekend.

 Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt collects rock samples at Station 1 during the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity at the Taurus-Littrow landing site, December 1, 1972, using a lunar rake tool.
Credits: Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 Commander / NASA

Researchers from Mount Holyoke College and UMass Amherst are among the teams chosen by NASA to study moon rocks gathered during Apollo missions 50 years ago. These rock samples haven't been unsealed before now. 

Considered the most definitive picture of Rocky fighting, this image depicts Roland LaStarza vs. Rocky at Madison Square Garden on September 24, 1953. The knockout blow, captured in the 11th round, shows the force of a Rocky punch.
Stonehill College Archives and Historical Collections: Stanley A. Bauman Photograph Collection

Seventy-two years ago this St. Patrick's Day, Rocky Marciano — one of the greatest heavyweight boxers of all time — came to fight in Holyoke, Massachusetts. It was a turning point in his life.

Composer Kenneth Fuchs, a UConn professor of music, left, and conductor Jo Ann Falletta, after winning a Grammy for Best Classical Compendium.
Courtesy of Kenneth Fuchs

UConn was a double winner at the Grammys on Sunday, in classical music and jazz.

Black ice on a lake, fast-frozen with no snow, is a unique natural element.
Ellery Berenger / NEPR

A few weeks of dry, cold January weather in western Massachusetts created ponds that were frozen sheer and smooth — like panes of glass — for the first time in years.

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