Jill Kaufman

Arts and Culture Reporter

Jill has been reporting, producing features and commentaries, and hosting shows at NEPR since 2005. Before that she spent almost 10 years at WBUR in Boston, five of them producing PRI’s “The Connection”  with Christopher Lydon. In the months leading up to the 2000 primary in New Hampshire, Jill hosted NHPR’s daily talk show, and subsequently hosted NPR’s All Things Considered during the South Carolina Primary weekend. Right before coming to NEPR, Jill was an editor at PRI's The World, working with station based reporters on the international stories in their own domestic backyards. Getting people to tell her their stories, she says, never gets old.

Tenth-grader Sarah Fisher's take on Vincent van Gogh's "Starry Night," at a recent night of "bad art" in Belchertown, Massachusetts.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

For many middle and high school students, the bar is set high for getting good grades, making the team, and landing the lead role in a play. Recognizing that, a library in western Massachusetts recently set the bar really low, offering a carefree event of making bad art.

Created by Kstudio - Freepik.com / Creative Commons

Updated on Jan. 8, 2018 

Massachusetts residents getting state assistance can now show their benefits card to buy discounted museum or concert tickets — and in some cases, get in for free.

Aerial map of the Edward J. Dwyer conservation area in Easthampton, Mass., where three trees were tagged with racist and anti-Semitic graffiti in late December 2018.
Courtesy / The Pascommuck Conservation Trust

Bright orange racist and anti-Semitic graffiti sprayed on three trees sometime after Christmas can still be seen in the woods along the Manhan River in Easthampton, Massachusetts.

Alexander George, by day a philosophy professor, by night a mentalist or mind reader. He hosts sessions at a cafe in Northampton, Mass.
Tom Wood

Alexander George has been demonstrating seemingly inexplicable feats at a hip Northampton, Massachusetts, café for a few months. 

Karin Sprague is among a small group of artists who still etch stone memorials by hand.
Courtesy of Karin Sprague

Early on, good at lettering, Karin Sprague found work painting names on boats. She opened a sign shop on Block Island. She went to art college, and began carving signs in wood. Then a teacher introduced her to stone.

Pages