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  • Hosted by Melissa Block, Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish

NEPR News Network: Weekdays, 4 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Weekends 5 p.m. – 6 p.m. Every weekday, join NPR’s Melissa Block, Audie Cornish, Robert Siegel and New England Public Radio’s Kari Njiiri and Adam Frenier, for breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special — sometimes quirky — features.

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SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

The Consumer Electronics Show, or CES, just wrapped up this week in Las Vegas. It featured the usual assortment of virtual reality goggles, smart cars, next generation smartphones. But arguably, the biggest buzz was about a product geared toward women that was conspicuously absent from the showroom floor. And here's where we want to mention that the conversation we're about to have may not be appropriate for younger listeners. For more, we turn now to Emily Dreyfuss, a senior staff writer for Wired.

Emily, thanks for joining us.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

The Consumer Electronics Show, or CES, just wrapped up this week in Las Vegas. It featured the usual assortment of virtual reality goggles, smart cars, next generation smartphones. But arguably, the biggest buzz was about a product geared toward women that was conspicuously absent from the showroom floor. And here's where we want to mention that the conversation we're about to have may not be appropriate for younger listeners. For more, we turn now to Emily Dreyfuss, a senior staff writer for Wired.

Emily, thanks for joining us.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Let's get some context now from NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley, who's here in the studio with us. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Ari.

SHAPIRO: So we just heard Corey Lewandowski say he thinks the president is getting closer to invoking his emergency powers to sidestep Congress and move ahead with the wall. What signals are you seeing from the White House?

With the partial government shutdown on the verge of becoming the longest in U.S. history, many housing advocates fear thousands of low-income Americans are at risk of being evicted. More than 1,000 government-backed housing contracts have already expired and potentially more will do so in the coming weeks.

Since the shutdown began last month, approximately 1,150 federal rental assistance contracts have not been renewed due to funding lapses at the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

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