CLIMATE CHANGE

In Leicester, Massachusetts, Cultivate workers help customers at the counter during the first day of recreational marijuana sales in the state.
Jesse Costa / WBUR

Massachusetts cities and towns are negotiating some big money for marijuana businesses. Some regulators say it's perhaps too much money. 

The Connecticut River in Old Lyme, Connecticut.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Climate change is expected to hit the Northeast pretty hard, affecting crops, ski resorts and fisheries on the coast. Here are some of our latest New England reports on climate change — from inland floods in New Hampshire, to a Connecticut forest, to a salt marsh north of Boston where there's an invasive plant that just won't quit.

Sea levels are rising all over the world, but in some East Coast regions they’re rising higher than in others.

Coastal communities along the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia, for instance, saw sea levels rise a foot-and-a-half over the 20th century, while seas in Portland, Maine, rose only about 6 inches. Boston lands in the middle, with seas rising about a foot over the same period. What gives? Isn’t it all the same ocean?

Friday night's rainfall in Washington, D.C., has elevated 2018 to the wettest year on record for the nation's capital, and the rain is expected to continue throughout the weekend.

The National Weather Service announced the rainfall record was surpassed at 6:26 a.m. on Saturday. So far, 61.34 inches of rain have fallen in Washington this year, breaking a record set in 1889 of 61.33 inches.

An additional inch or so of rain may fall through Sunday, pushing the tally even higher.

As the international climate summit in southern Poland enters its second and final week, most countries agree on the basic scientific facts: greenhouse gasses are causing climate change, and every country is feeling its effects.

But the United States, under the leadership of President Trump, has taken a different view. The administration questions the overwhelming scientific evidence suggesting that human activity is causing the climate to warm. As a result, the U.S., which has been a leader in past negotiations, is playing unpredictable role in this year's summit.

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