CONGRESS

Federal employees in Massachusetts had mixed reactions Friday to news of the deal to end the longest partial government shutdown in history.

The proposal, backed by President Trump and congressional leaders, would fund the government for just a few weeks, through Feb. 15. It does not include funding for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border that Trump had sought.

Updated at 9:45 p.m. ET

The longest government shutdown in history ended after President Trump signed a bipartisan three-week stopgap funding measure late Friday. Several agencies had been partially shuttered for 35 days.

"I am very proud to announce today that we have reached a deal to end the shutdown and reopen the federal government," Trump said earlier Friday in the White House Rose Garden, announcing the long-awaited bipartisan breakthrough.

After a week of tit for tat with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, amid a monthlong government shutdown, the White House is now moving ahead with plans for the president's State of the Union address, proceeding as if it were happening as originally planned next week.

White House officials are aiming for the speech to occur before a joint session of Congress on Tuesday, Jan. 29. But it is far from guaranteed. The House must pass a resolution to call a joint session with the Senate before the president can come speak.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren told more than 400 people who gathered at Manchester Community College on Saturday that her life experience informs policy goals like lifting the minimum wage, making education more affordable, and increasing inheritance taxes to pay for affordable housing.

Warren argued that the country needs leadership committed to ensuring that what she called "the rules," aren’t tilted to benefit the wealthy and well-connected.

“Rules matter, rules made in Washington matter, and that’s why I’m in this fight, that’s it.”

As NPR reports:

President Trump made his case to the American people Tuesday night for why a massive wall along the Mexican border is necessary, using his first Oval Office address to outline his conditions for ending the 18-day-and-counting partial government shutdown.

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