CONSERVATION

Great Food Comes With Great Waste At UMass

Jan 16, 2019
UMass Amherst emphasizes composting, providing compostable utensils, napkins and cups in the dining areas.
Ayelet Ehrenkranz / NEPR

The phrase “number one dining” is often thrown around at UMass Amherst. But with all that great food comes great waste.

An American Robin is measured as part of federal research on urban wildlife in a backyard in Greenfield, Massachusetts.
Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

Federal researchers in western Massachusetts study ways to protect migrating fish, backyard birds and urban trees. The government shutdown is keeping them home and away from their research.

Aerial map of the Edward J. Dwyer conservation area in Easthampton, Mass., where three trees were tagged with racist and anti-Semitic graffiti in late December 2018.
Courtesy / The Pascommuck Conservation Trust

Bright orange racist and anti-Semitic graffiti sprayed on three trees sometime after Christmas can still be seen in the woods along the Manhan River in Easthampton, Massachusetts.

Plastic water bottles.
Ricardo Bernado / Creative Commons/www.flickr.com/photos/zone41/4102673364

A ban on plastic water bottles originally set to take effect on New Year's Day in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, has been pushed back until the spring.

Sea levels are rising all over the world, but in some East Coast regions they’re rising higher than in others.

Coastal communities along the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia, for instance, saw sea levels rise a foot-and-a-half over the 20th century, while seas in Portland, Maine, rose only about 6 inches. Boston lands in the middle, with seas rising about a foot over the same period. What gives? Isn’t it all the same ocean?

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