EDUCATION

Student Mayrangelique Rojas De Leon talks about what's ahead after graduation from Holyoke High School in June.
Jill Kaufman / NEPR

After Hurricane Maria last September, a few thousand school aged-students were among those who left Puerto Rico with their families and came to New England. As the school year wraps up some of them are graduating, thousands of miles away from home.

Outgoing Berkshire District Attorney David Capeless speaks during a press conference in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, on Thursday, March 1, 2018.
Dave Roback / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a law, opening the door to state legalizing sports gambling. And in Massachusetts, top state lawmakers say they should look into it, but stopped short of any commitment. 

Massachusetts lawmakers have apparently shelved a bill that aims to prevent the so-called “meal shaming” of schoolchildren who have not paid for their lunches.

Meal shaming is what happens when students are publicly denied their school meals because their lunch account is in arrears. Proponents of the bill, which lawmakers said Tuesday needs more study, worry that meal shaming harms children.

The Connecticut Supreme Court is likely to decide this week whether to allow 10 families of victims in the 2012 Newtown school shooting to sue Remington, the company that manufactured the assault-style rifle used in the massacre. Law experts say if the case moves forward, it would be the furthest a lawsuit has gone involving a gun manufacturer since Congress passed a law in 2005 that broadly protects gun makers from lawsuits.

On Thursday, the Massachusetts Senate will consider a bill that would recalculate the expected cost of public education across the state — and could drive millions more dollars into schools over the course of several years.

Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz, a Jamaica Plain Democrat, is the bill’s lead sponsor. She co-chaired a commission that looked into the existing budget formula back in 2015.

That commission found that districts were being asked to pay radically more than state benchmarks anticipated.

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