IMMIGRATION

Anthony Gulluni is the district attorney for Hampden County, Mass.
File photo / The Republican

This week, Hampden District Attorney Anthony Gulluni established a clergy abuse hotline. He says the move comes after the Springfield Diocese recently published the number of reports of clergy sexual abuse, which the D.A. says doesn't match what has been sent to his office. 

A group rallies in Northampton, Massachusetts, on February 18, 2019.
Sean Teehan / NEPR

About 150 people showed up in the snow in Northampton, Massachusetts, on Monday to oppose President Trump's emergency declaration.

Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts.
Charles Fulton / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/12216515@N00

Hampshire College says it's looking for a "strategic partnership" as it faces a tough financial foreceast. Our Short List panel takes a look at that and other news of the week.

People cheer after Springfield's City Council overrode a mayoral veto to pass the "Welcoming Community Trust" ordinance.
Sean Teehan / NEPR

After a legislative back-and-forth between the City Council and mayor in Springfield, Massachusetts, the city now has a so-called “sanctuary” ordinance on the books.

As the federal government shutdown enters its 14th day, the backlog of cases in immigration court continues to increase — drawing mixed reactions from immigration experts.

Since the shutdown, dockets in immigration court have been frozen for those who aren’t in custody. Some experts worry this means immigrants are being denied due process; others see it as a welcome respite, giving some immigrants more time to get their affairs in order.

Lawyers say the freeze comes as immigration proceedings have reached a frenzied pace under the Trump administration.

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