NEW HAMPSHIRE

Coverage of New Hampshire from New England Public Radio, NPR, and other NPR stations.

Researchers have finished their largest study to date on how ticks and warming winters are hurting moose in Northern New England.

The data shows unprecedented death rates among moose calves -- more than 50 percent in four of the past five years, plus lower reproductive rates in adult moose across Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont.

U.S. Sentaor Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire, at a hearing of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee on Oct. 10, 2018.
Screen Shot / C-SPAN

New Hampshire Senator Maggie Hassan said she wants to make sure the FBI has the authority and the tools it needs to crack down on so-called "deepfakes."

The Connecticut River seen in Sunderland, Massachusetts.
Tom Walsh / Creative Commons / flickr.com/photos/wmass

Thousands of volunteers helped collect an estimated 50 tons of trash from the Connecticut River and its tributaries in four states last week.

Betsy Gardella, who has led New Hampshire Public Radio since 2005 as President and CEO, says she will retire from the organization at the end of the year.

(Click here to listen to Todd Bookman talk about this story with All Things Considered host Peter Biello, including how NHPR set up an independent reporting team to cover it.)

The announcement comes after “serious management, human resources and communication issues” were identified by independent investigators brought in by the station’s Board of Trustees following complaints from employees. NHPR Board of Trustees Chair Marshall Rowe notified staff of that investigation in an email in late May.

Voting in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Robin Lubbock / WBUR

The state of New Hampshire is indicting a couple for knowingly voting in more than one state in the 2016 presidential election.

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