VERMONT

Coverage of Vermont from New England Public Radio, NPR, and other NPR stations.

On Oct. 1, it will be illegal in Vermont to possess bump stocks — a device that attaches to a semi-automatic weapon to speed up the rate it fires.

And starting Monday, Sept. 17, the Vermont State Police will accept bump stocks from residents who voluntarily turn them over.

Vermont branches of the NAACP will hold their first-ever candidate forums in Rutland and Brattleboro this weekend, but most of the major-party nominees invited to participate have chosen not to attend.

The Vermont Attorney General’s Office has taken over an investigation into allegations of racial harassment against a sitting state lawmaker in Bennington, amid criticism from racial justice advocates over local law enforcement’s handling of the case.

Many Vermonters were shocked last month when the state’s only African-American female lawmaker announced that, after years of racial harassment, she was withdrawing from her re-election campaign.

Tabitha Pohl-Moore, the Vermont director of the NAACP, was less surprised.

Lake Champlain has a long history as a commercial waterway. In the 1800s, it was a crowded passage for boats hauling lumber and other goods between New York City and Montreal and points in between.

Much of that industry is long gone, but there's still some work on the lake for those who want it.

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