WEATHER

The Connecticut River in Old Lyme, Connecticut.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Climate change is expected to hit the Northeast pretty hard, affecting crops, ski resorts and fisheries on the coast. Here are some of our latest New England reports on climate change — from inland floods in New Hampshire, to a Connecticut forest, to a salt marsh north of Boston where there's an invasive plant that just won't quit.

Friday night's rainfall in Washington, D.C., has elevated 2018 to the wettest year on record for the nation's capital, and the rain is expected to continue throughout the weekend.

The National Weather Service announced the rainfall record was surpassed at 6:26 a.m. on Saturday. So far, 61.34 inches of rain have fallen in Washington this year, breaking a record set in 1889 of 61.33 inches.

An additional inch or so of rain may fall through Sunday, pushing the tally even higher.

Researchers in Puerto Rico say hurricanes Irma and María made long-lasting and ongoing impacts to forest and coastal ecosystems.

It may seem paradoxical, but sugar maple trees need snow to grow.

Each winter, a deep blanket of snow — 8 inches deep or more — covers about 65 percent of northeastern sugar maples. Without this insulating snow, the soil freezes deeper and longer, damaging the trees’ shallow roots.

Climate change will hit the Northeast hard and soon, bringing threats to our health — and to fruit crops, ski resorts and the Atlantic cod.

Those are some conclusions from the fourth National Climate Assessment, which was released on Friday — the day after Thanksgiving — in what some see as an attempt to blunt media coverage. Thirteen federal agencies contributed to the 1,656-page report, which is mandated by law and produced every four years.

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