WEATHER

There's more rain falling on some parts of the U.S. than there used to be, and many towns just aren't ready for the flooding that follows.

Ellicott City, Md., is one such community. Nestled in a valley west of Baltimore, the town was founded in 1772, and some Revolutionary War-era buildings still house businesses along the narrow main street in historic downtown. It also sits at the confluence of three streams.

Hurricanes are moving more slowly over both land and water, and that's bad news for communities in their path.

In the past 70 years, tropical cyclones around the world have slowed down 10 percent, and in some regions of the world, the change has been even more significant, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

That means storms are spending more time hanging out, battering buildings with wind and dropping more rain.

A tree snapped in the picnic area of Sleeping Giant State Park in Hamden, Connecticut. The park is closed due to damage from a May 15th storm, which included four tornadoes.
Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Connecticut state officials are appealing to the Federal Emergency Management Agency for help recovering from a May 15 storm, which caused widespread damage in Fairfield, Litchfield, and New Haven counties.

Over the last nine months, Connecticut's weather has wreaked havoc on school schedules, especially those in the western part of the state that got hit by the recent tornado. So some districts leaders have said they won’t be able to provide the mandatory 180 days of instruction, so they’re asking the state for a waiver.

Some Connecticut municipalities continue to make repairs following two tornados that swept through the area.

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