Music

From jazz, to classical and world music, NEPR entertains, inspires and enriches lives seven days a week with its signature music programming. Our hosts provide in-depth knowledge about music they share and keep listeners up-to-date on music events happening throughout the region on air and on Facebook.

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Buddy Bolden's Blues

Mar 7, 2019
Jelly Roll Morton
Hogan Jazz Archive / Tulane University

Jelly Roll Morton immortalized the most mythical of New Orleans jazz pioneers in his composition, "I Thought i Heard Buddy Bolden Say." He recorded it twice in 1939, first for RCA Bluebird with a band that included New Orleanians Sidney Bechet, Albert Nicholas, Wellman Braud, and Zutty Singleton. Four months later, on December 16, 1939, he recorded the tune as "Buddy Bolden's Blues" on a solo session for General Records. It was later released in an album by Commodore.  

Composer Kenneth Fuchs, a UConn professor of music, left, and conductor Jo Ann Falletta, after winning a Grammy for Best Classical Compendium.
Courtesy of Kenneth Fuchs

UConn was a double winner at the Grammys on Sunday, in classical music and jazz.

Notwithstanding the bold and daring recordings made by Sonny Rollins, Max Roach, Abbey Lincoln, Charles Mingus, and other musicians who found common cause with the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950’s and early ‘60’s, jazz was absent from the musical proceedings at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.  Mahalia Jackson, Joan Baez, Odetta, Bob Dylan, Josh White, Bernice Reagan (later a founder of Sweet Honey in the Rock), and Peter, Paul & Mary were accorded the musical honors.  However, no less a figure than the event's headliner, Dr.

Allison Miner at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival in 1991
The Times-Picayune

Here's a moving film tribute to Allison Miner, a beautiful spirit who made a major difference to the preservation and perpetuation of the musical culture of New Orleans between her arrival in the Crescent City in 1967 and her death in 1995 at age 46. Allison was instrumental in establishing the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, albeit with a sexist-driven subordinate role and title that she discusses in Amy Nesbitt's film.

Joseph Jarman
Marilyn Yee / The New York Times

Joseph Jarman, who died on Wednesday, January 9, at 81, was an icon of free jazz and best known for his long association with the Art Ensemble of Chicago. Born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, and raised in Chicago, Jarman played woodwinds (saxophones, flutes, and clarinet) and was a founding member of both the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians and the AEC.

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